Amiga ends ‘freedom of information’ policy

And, in the face of users who still think it's 1985, who can blame it?

Opinion Amiga, inc. today scaled back its attempts to be rather more open with the Amiga community than it has in the past. Set in motion by Amiga president Jim Collas, Amiga Glasnost centred on regular updates on the company's progress both as a business and as a technology developer. However, according to the company's Web site, "for the next several months, the Amiga staff will be focused on implementing our business and product plans. We will not be discussing or commenting on future company directions during this time". So there... Still, given the grief Collas and co. have been given by the more conservative -- dare we say 'backward looking'? -- members of the Amiga community, primarily over the company's decision to base the next generation of the Amiga Operating Environment on Linux rather than the more AmigaOS-like (at least in the die hards' view) QNX, you can't blame the man for saying: 'To hell with this openness -- we'll just do what every other computer company does and keep our mouths shut.' It's notable that Commodore wannabe Iwin has suddenly taken the same approach. Ultra-minority computer systems -- sorry, folks, but that's what the Amiga is. For now... -- tend to be supported by people who are most insistent that their favourite system is the best, despite the fact it may have been long out-evolved by 'fitter' systems. That insistence on maintaining an identity in the face of the facts, tends to generate a proportionally higher number of users willing to toss their orb around, often without any real appreciation of the way the computer business works. One or two Mac users we could mention behave in just the same way, and the Mac is way more viable than the Amiga is right now. No wonder then that Collas who, to be fair, is probably doing what he can to maintain the viability of the Amiga platform, has got a little fed up with the carping of those who insist on living in the past, circa 1985. ®

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