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UK boffins unveil $35 ‘2300GB on a PC Card’ RAM breakthrough

Hard drive industry placed on DefCon 1

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A team of UK researchers from Keele University have developed a "three-dimensional memory system" which, they claim, offers the highest storage densities ever achieved. In fact, the technology can squeeze 2300GB into a PC Card-sized device, according to yesterday's Mail on Sunday. And the system is scalable so that even a wristwatch could contain 100GB of storage capacity. And alongside the technological breakthrough came a rare example of British entrepreneurship: Keele and capital management company Cavendish Management Resources (CMR) have formed a JV, Keele High Density, to market and license the technology. We Brits have long had a reputation of coming up with cracking innovations but being completely unable to exploit them. CMR MD Mike Downey was particularly bullish about the innovation, describing it as "big as the creation of the microchip". He predicted the technology would eliminate the hard drive, and that once the new memory system goes into production, units will cost only £35 to make. Maybe, but that may be a little way off. The technology, which, according to the MoS report, exploits the storage properties of a new family of alloys, is currently awaiting various patents to be granted -- which is probably why the team isn't too keen on discussing how it works. Further development work needs to be done to get the technology ready for mass production. However, the researchers, led by Professor Ted Williams, who cuts a Sir Clive Sinclair-style figure but can at least, having led the development of the nuclear magnetic resonance scanner, claim to have invented something useful, said the technology can be easily incorporated into existing computer hardware. ® More details of the breakthrough See also More from Keele IBM slashes hard drive recording speed Samsung unveils SDRAM-beating SGRAM Tosh develops combo CD/DVD drive Hitachi cracks 'movie on a chip' memory Sinclair plans Linux box for comeback

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

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