Feeds

UK boffins unveil $35 ‘2300GB on a PC Card’ RAM breakthrough

Hard drive industry placed on DefCon 1

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

A team of UK researchers from Keele University have developed a "three-dimensional memory system" which, they claim, offers the highest storage densities ever achieved. In fact, the technology can squeeze 2300GB into a PC Card-sized device, according to yesterday's Mail on Sunday. And the system is scalable so that even a wristwatch could contain 100GB of storage capacity. And alongside the technological breakthrough came a rare example of British entrepreneurship: Keele and capital management company Cavendish Management Resources (CMR) have formed a JV, Keele High Density, to market and license the technology. We Brits have long had a reputation of coming up with cracking innovations but being completely unable to exploit them. CMR MD Mike Downey was particularly bullish about the innovation, describing it as "big as the creation of the microchip". He predicted the technology would eliminate the hard drive, and that once the new memory system goes into production, units will cost only £35 to make. Maybe, but that may be a little way off. The technology, which, according to the MoS report, exploits the storage properties of a new family of alloys, is currently awaiting various patents to be granted -- which is probably why the team isn't too keen on discussing how it works. Further development work needs to be done to get the technology ready for mass production. However, the researchers, led by Professor Ted Williams, who cuts a Sir Clive Sinclair-style figure but can at least, having led the development of the nuclear magnetic resonance scanner, claim to have invented something useful, said the technology can be easily incorporated into existing computer hardware. ® More details of the breakthrough See also More from Keele IBM slashes hard drive recording speed Samsung unveils SDRAM-beating SGRAM Tosh develops combo CD/DVD drive Hitachi cracks 'movie on a chip' memory Sinclair plans Linux box for comeback

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich
New 'Atlas of ICT Activity' finds innovation isn't happening at Silicon Roundabout
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
It may be ILLEGAL to run Heartbleed health checks – IT lawyer
Do the right thing, earn up to 10 years in clink
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.