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‘2300GB on a PC Card’ RAM technology: more details

Team also to revolutionise sanitation, gynaecology, spreadsheets

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Intelligent flash storage arrays

More details have emerged regarding the amazing '2300GB on a PC Card' memory technology developed by a Keele University team led by the remarkable Professor Ted Williams. (Even as we speak, Register scriptwriters are working on the pilot episode of Prof. Ted, Craggy Island's very own quantum mechanic: "Feck! Girls! Many-particle Wave Functions!"). The team's system crams 86GB of data storage per square centimetre of physical medium, and uses a magneto-optical system to read, erase and write data within the solid state system. That allows, claim the researchers, a data access rate of 100Mbps. We also learn that Cavendish Management Resources (CMR), which is providing the business brains behind the Keele/CMR joint venture, Keele High Density, is also pioneering the following scientific curiousities, among others: "Zodee -- A disposable toilet cleaning device which avoids the hygiene problems associated with conventional toilet brushes. With major application in hotels and hospitals, this product is likely to be of interest to manufacturers, and downstream processors, of paper tissue." The Register says: Expect Intel to launch its Downstream processor Real Soon Now. "Disposal Speculum -- A unique inflatable vaginal speculum which cost effectively solves the problems of current instruments. This project has caused worldwide interest from manufacturers of medical disposables, and is likely to make a major impact on the speculum market." The Register says: We always preferred the Sinclair Speculum. "Light Weight Wheel -- A totally new concept for a combined light weight wheel/hub, likely to be of interest to manufacturers of automotive wheels and/or hubs." The Register says: Wheel meet again, don't know where, don't know when... CMR is promoting something called X-Cel. We're not sure what it is -- something to do with concrete, apparently -- but we're told Bill Gates already has his lawyers onto it... ®

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