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Bugs in Microsoft software have given rise to a new class of security problem for which antivirus software is completely ineffective. The problem arises because Microsoft decrees that IE can "trust" MS Office 97 programs and it is therefore possible for hackers to slip in something destructive through this route. This design loophole affects Windows 9x and NT, including Windows 2000. Microsoft acknowledged the problem only because of the publicity in a NYT article on Saturday. Andrew Dixon, the group product manager for MS Office, said Microsoft was "working on testing a solution". An AP follow-up revealed that Microsoft expected "to have an Office fix ready as early as Tuesday". These latest bugs involve a DLL in Office 97, where the JET version 3.5 engine "trusts" Office. The problem is not confined to versions of Office with Access, because JET is included with the standard version as well. Microsoft knew about this, and updated JET to version 4 in Windows 2000 to deal with the particular problem. With version 3.5, JET queries to databases can trigger commands to erase files or discs, as a result of a request from Office for data. Microsoft suggested downloading 8 megabytes of JET 4.0, but then withdrew this suggestion. Juan Carlos Cuartango, a programmer who had previously identified problems in IE and Navigator, found that the trust relationship was at fault, and could allow Trojan Horses to gallop in. Dangerous ActiveX controls An second problem is being experienced by users of recent Compaq and HP PCs, with Compaq admitting it and HP in denial. This concerns a digitally-signed applet that can execute programs when directed by a Web page. Even worse -- it is possible to email the applet. Again, Microsoft knew about this, starting with its discovery in November by Frank Farance of Farance Inc, and its more recent rediscovery by Richard Smith of Pharlap on an HP Pavilion last month. Smith pointed out that two ActiveX controls were dangerous, and could be used on a Web page to embed script code in an HTML email in Outlook or even Eudora. The ActiveX controls allow programs to read and write the Windows registry. As a result, Smith noted, a virus of malicious software could be installed; Windows security checking could be switched off; personal files could be read [by Microsoft for example]; documents could be deleted; and systems files could be removed to stop booting. Smith found four different ActiveX controls on the HP from three different vendors compromised security. He suggested that PC makers should take a closer look at the ActiveX controls that they ship with their hardware. Until Microsoft comes clean about all the problems that have been identified, it may be politic for users to switch off ActiveX controls in IE. ®

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