Feeds

MS to develop broadband wireless network?

The mysterious case of the non-existent press release...

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Microsoft has been throwing its weight around in the wireless and cable TV businesses, but if a curious snippet that briefly escaped onto a wire service last week has any substance, the company clearly intends to go a lot further. According to a brief Dow Jones posting early on Friday, "In a press release Thursday [Microsoft] said it plans to develop a high-speed wireless network to play music or videos and display photographs." Fascinating stuff, particularly as Microsoft didn't issue a press release saying this on Thursday. Or even on Wednesday or Friday, come to that. But if Dow Jones reports a Microsoft story that doesn't happen, it's still interesting. The Dow-Wall Street Journal operations have a remarkable facility for obtaining advance press release information from many companies, and their relationship with the printer in Microsoft's press office often looks particularly symbiotic. So it would seem likely that there was a press release, but that for some reason it didn't get issued last week after all. The fact that Dow didn't follow the story up with expanded versions (as it usually does in these cases) lends weight to the theory that MS made a last minute handbrake turn. But why? Well, developing a "high-speed wireless network" from scratch would be fiendishly expensive, and even if Microsoft could afford it, technically the company couldn't go it alone. It already has a joint venture with Qualcomm, Wireless Knowledge, has a vision of "information access any time, anywhere, from any device," and has been buying wireless outfits it deems strategic in the wireless arena. But the component Microsoft doesn't have at the moment is the network itself, and that may be why the press release (if it really was a press release) got pulled (if it really did get pulled). Wireless Knowledge has been stitching up deals with Metricom, which is a possible partner for Microsoft here. Metricom is owned by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, and runs a wireless Web service in various parts of the US. It's currently testing 128k systems, so could qualify, and although its reach isn't massive, the network could be expanded, and Paul Allen's large US cable TV interests could be helpful here. Or failing this, there's AT&T, which is already a Microsoft partner in cable, and has extensive US wireless interests. Or Sprint? Or even Vodafone-Airtouch? But the trouble with the cellular outfits is that their broadband roadmaps are longer-range than Microsoft would be likely to want. Something's certainly brewing, so maybe if the Ts & Cs can be thrashed out, we'll see an announcement next week. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence
Download Choosing a Cloud Hosting Provider with Confidence to learn more about cloud computing - the new opportunities and new security challenges.