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Chipzilla in 133MHz FSB bet hedging shocker

…don’t hold yer breath for it

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Despite gingerly dipping its corporate toe in the PC133 DRAM water, everyone’s favourite chip behemoth seems to lack conviction on either those nice fast DRAMs or the long-awaited Camino i820 chipset, due to arrive any eon now. The venerable BX chipset (which should have been headed for the chip gulag by now had not Camino veered off the roadmap and into a ditch) seems to be being groomed to scale heights never originally planned for it. We remember about a year back when Chipzilla’s official line was that 500MHz was as high as the BX would ever go. Now as we all know there is a 550MHz Pentium III part already here and a 600MHz just around the corner, this is obviously not the case. And just what Intel plans for the BX and its trusty 100MHz FSB can be seen when installing the latest BIOS for its own brand Seattle2 BX mobo - the options for processor clock speed include 550 and 600MHz, but also, rather amusingly, include support for 650, 700, 750 and 800MHz. We now await the arrival of an Intel BX motherboard supporting a 1GHz processor - September, anyone? ®

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