64M memory parts rise 25 per cent in two weeks

Micron hits back at Dresdner Kleinwort Benson report and hints at legal action

The prices of 64Mbit synchronous DRAM parts have risen by as much as 25 per cent over the last two weeks, to around $6, after rumours circulated in the industry that Micron had problems making them. However, last week, Micron took the unusual step of publicly refuting a Dresdner Kleinwort Benson report that it had production problems. Two weeks ago, we contacted Micron which denied then that there were any problems. (Micron says it has no problems with memories, whatever) In a company statement, CEO Steve Appleton said: "Although the company normally does not respond to comments made by industry analysts, the misinformation contained in the Dresdner Keinwort Benson report is so inflammatory and rumors have persisted for so long that the company felt it was appropriate to respond. It is unfortunate that Dresdner would propagate this misinformation in the marketplace and that others would continue to irresponsibly report these inaccurate claims. We are currently reviewing our legal options." Micron also said it has submitted a complaint to the Japanese Fair Trade Commission. Richard Gordon, senior memory analyst at Dataquest Europe, said: "The prices [of 64Mbit SDRAM] rose in reaction to those rumours before Micron officially denied it." He said: "The more interesting question is why spot prices have remained high ever since." Gordon said that it was likely that there was a lot of stock holding going on in a bid to keep the memory price stable. But, he said, such moves were only likely to have a short term effect, and Dataquest anticipated memory prices falling again over the coming quarter. ®

Sponsored: Network DDoS protection