Feeds

CompaQ gets all serious about Linux

But Tru64 Unix a better bet, Q execs say

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Major hardware firm Compaq is showing that it considers Linux is pretty important to its future plans. If you turn to this page, you will see that the big Q has a little penguin on its site and is offering a Fortran compile to the bunnies who find the page. When you get there, click on the Software link. The first thing you see when you go to the site is the magic phrase, Linus Torvalds. Three days ago, at the UK Networks Show, Compaq executives were insisting that sales of Linux boxes did not have a great takeup in the corporate community. A senior executive at Compaq UK said that IT managers, although they had Linux servers and OSS running, were not prepared to admit it to their bosses. Instead, they were flocking to supported versions of Unix, such as D/UX, now known as Tru64. However, those statements were contradicted by Tikiri Wanduragala, EMEA server manager at IBM. He said: "Because we support Linux, we are finding a big uptake of systems in the corporate community. Our Linux servers are going great guns." ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?