Web hate sites target women and children

Racists, fascists and terrorists show their true colours online

A report published tomorrow will reveal how hate groups are targeting women and children on the Web to spread bigotry and prejudice. In particular, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) claims that impressionable teenagers are being influenced by offensive material as the Web becomes a breeding ground for a disaffected minority. Much of it is being generated by white supremacists, claims ADL. "[Using the Web] is a way to bring people into the movement," said the report's author Jordan B Kessler in an interview with the New York Times. Poisoning the Web: Hatred Online also highlights how women are being influenced by extreme feminist groups. The problem of hate groups was just one of the issues highlighted in a report today by the National Criminal Intelligence Service, which also called for a UK-wide cybercrime fighting agency to be set up. The findings of Project Trawler appear to support the report due to be published by ADL. According to Project Trawler the number of hate Web sites has increased from 50 in 1995 to almost 1,500 today. Most of these sites are based in the US and focus on racism, neo-nazism and terrorism. Earlier this year a number of anti-abortionists were fined more than $100 million for publishing the names of doctors and users of termination clinics across the US. The court in Oregon found that the Nuremberg Files Web site contained extremist material likely to incite violence. ®

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