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Intel board alliance pushes PII in embedded market

Here we go with Pentium class ATMs, cash registers etc...

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Intel's Applied Computing Platform Provider (ACPP) program has finally broken surface, after being accidentally preannounced by program member Texas Micro last week. (Intel mystery alliance) The deal, basically, seems to be to encourage a strictly-regulated group of third party board vendors to push forward Intel standards in specialist/embedded sectors. Intel refers to this area as 'Applied Computing' and categorises it as consisting of retail and financial transaction terminals, industrial terminals and communications systems. The company announced the ACPP program yesterday, alongside a low power Intel Pentium II targeted at the sector. According to Intel embedded general manager and VP Tom Franz: "An exploding need for connectivity in the high-performance market segment of non-PC applications is driving the transition to standards-based building blocks," and the low-power PII is of course one of these building blocks. But a swift read of the ACPP FAQ produces some closer pointers as to what Intel is up to. Q: "Do ACPP products use non-Intel components? A: All ACPPs provide solutions using Intel components [i.e., no]." And: "Intel is working closely with the ACPPs to make sure that the latest Intel technology is made available to the applied computing market segment in a timely manner." That is, as fast as possible. Q: "Does the Intel Applied Computing Platform Providers program support legacy Intel Architecture-based products? A: No. The Intel Applied Computing Platform Providers program is focused on providing the latest technology to the applied computing market segment; however, Intel continues to support legacy Intel Architecture components." So it's an Intel scheme to get a gang of nine highly trusted partners to push Intel's new generation standards into the market as fast as possible, and dump the legacy stuff entirely. The full gang of nine consists of Advantech, Force Computers, Motorola (no, seriously), Portwell, RadiSys, Teknor, Texas Micro, Trenton Technology and Ziatech. ®

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