Intel's Itanium and Intel Pla Y make trademark debuts

What's all this then?

You've got to watch Intel like a hawk. So we do. The latest trademarks the chip giant has registered tell a story all their own. As far as we can see, Itanium is a very wide-ranging trademark which covers, amongst other things, operating system software, operating programs, system extensions, software for connecting PCs, computer hardware, integrated chips, circuit boards, fax/modems and microprocessors. The list is huge, so it must be an important one. Here it is in full. " Computer operating system software; computer operating programs; computer system extensions, tools and utilities in the field of application software for connecting personal computers, networks, telecommunications apparatus and global computer network applications; audio and video graphics for real time information and image transfer, transmission, reception, processing and digitizing; computer firmware; computer hardware; computer peripherals; integrated circuits; integrated circuit chips; semiconductor processors; semiconductor processor chips; microprocessors; printed circuit boards; electronic circuit boards; computer memory devices; semiconductor memory devices; video circuit boards; audio circuit boards; audio video circuit boards; video graphic accelerators; multimedia accelerators; video processors; fax/modems; computer hardware and software for the transmission and receipt of facsimiles; computer hardware and software for the development, maintenance, and use of local and wide area computer networks; computer hardware and software for the development, maintenance, and use of interactive audio-video computer conference systems; computer hardware and software for the receipt, display, and use of broadcast video, audio, and digital data signals." And Intel Pla Y is possibly even more interesting. It also has the alternative name In Tell Play. According to the application, it represents: "Hand held unit for playing video games; video output toys and games; electronically operated toys; interactive computer toys and games; computer networked toys and games; computer peripheral toys and games; electronic games." So maybe Intel is taking the PlayStation II more seriously than we thought. ®

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