Bull research points out e-government failings

All very well having plans to use the Web, but what if no one knows about it?

The government may have lofty ideals about delivering all its services electronically by 2008, but it's doing a lousy job of letting people know about it. Only one in ten people know of the government's electronic intentions although once explained to them, a hefty majority believe it will be a good thing -- if it ever happens. That's the conclusion of an e-government report by the IT company Bull, which commissioned the research. The report is the first public opinion survey to emerge following prime minister Tony Blair's high-profile announcement of government's intention to deliver all its services electronically by 2008. But while The Bull E-Government Report found that the public is "highly supportive of the concept of electronic government", it also raises concerns about the lack of knowledge about the government's plans, the low levels of technology access and concerns about privacy and security. "This is a highly important survey in terms of getting a true understanding of the issues that face the British government as it moves to an e-government model," said Barry Grisdale, CEO, Bull UK and Ireland. "The responses clearly show that the public is behind the concept of electronic government, but also that there is still a lot of education to be done to ensure that the public has a positive response to these changes. "E-government will only work if the general population accepts it and can see a personal benefit." ®

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