AMD carries on cutting prices

Intel's 450MHz/PIII under pressure

Just as eggs is eggs, AMD will tomorrow slash prices on its processors, following cuts Intel has just as quietly made. (See Don't buy an Intel Inside PC) Reports said that AMD will slash prices by up to 45 per cent on some parts, shadowing the cuts we predicted over a month ago. The K6-III/450, which competes with the PIII/450, is expected to be priced at $226/1000. That is cheaper than the Pentium III/450, which as our roadmap shows, is now $268(See Intel desktop chip prices) And AMD is certain to re-visit its prices in July, when some Celerons head towards the gulag. Intel will tomorrow release its 550MHz Pentium III, but that means its current 450MHz and 500MHz Pentium III prices will start plummeting. By September this year, those prices will almost have halved. By that time, Intel will be ready to start Coppermining, in the process obsoleting Slot One chips and waving goodbye for ever to Pentium IIs. plummeting PIII prices Incidentally, one of our readers posted us a furious mail saying that Intel should not be investigated for price slashing which has resulted in Cyrix and IDT prices falling. (Story: Will the FTC re-open Intel investigation?) It’s AMD’s fault, he suggested. We suppose you could take that point of view, but if so, you could posit that prices of PCs which cost around $800 now would be around $3,500. There’s no doubt AMD’s moves have forced Intel to revisit its price structure and its product introduction. AMD will intro its K7 at speeds of 550MHz, and at prices in the hundreds of dollars, which will challenge Intel's 550MHz, which intros at an astonishingly expensive $744/1000. The gladiatoral combat, or the battle between TweedleAMD and TweedleDUM-DUM is on… ® See also Celeron trashes PII in new RegMark tests This article, by The Sherriff, explores the essential non difference between the Celeron and the Pentium II platforms (except for the huge disparities in pricing), and why consumers should not be fooled by marketing hype.

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