Corel back on track – page 2 of 3

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Previous Page Cowpland on... Java Cowpland is adamant that WordPerfect Office 2000 for Linux and Corel Draw 9 for Linux were not going to be a re-run of Corel's less than successful efforts on the Java front. "Sun over-promised and under-delivered," Cowpland claimed. "You could say that Sun conned the industry because there's never been a Java as promised. We took a bit of heat for that. "The good thing about Linux is that it's out there, performing like a champion today... The Linux technology is more solid than Windows. There were onerous licensing terms." Cowpland continued: "They [Sun] were charging $250,000 [licence fee] for something that was supposed to be open technology. It was a nice idea that never came through." So far as IBM's use of Java was concerned, Cowpland believed that IBM was using Java "to unify their internal languages". Windows compatibility Corel is playing a significant role in the Wine project, which makes it possible for any Windows application to run on Linux at the same speed as on Windows, unlike with emulators such as Wabi that run more slowly. Cowpland estimated that Corel is providing around 20 per cent of the effort for Wine, with a dozen or so programmers working on it. The end result for Corel will be the software for a Linux desktop. Corel has also announced an alliance with KDE (for its Project product) and Debian (for its GNU/Linux distribution). Corel is positioning itself as a mass market Linux supplier, with tens of millions of units, while Red Hat and Caldera will be more service-based, Cowpland said. Corel has a list of important things missing from Linux at the moment, and Cowpland claims to be addressing each one. The result will be Corel's own Linux distribution. Next Page

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