Feeds

SCO boss blows stack over Linux, Linus

Michels goes into lather over litigious Norwegian (sic) kids, and much else

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes

SCO president and CEO Doug Michels has lashed-out at Linux, describing it as "not particularly scalable" and some kind of packaging operation that has turned into a religion. Michels' reckless assault comes in an interview published this week by Computerworld - as yet we have no reports of vengeful mullahs camped on his lawn. But they may not have noticed Michels' outrageous attack on Linus Torvalds yet. Casting doubt on the viability of the Linux licensing model and, as far as we can make out, Torvalds' parentage, maturity and integrity, Mouthie Mikey says: "The last thing [major companies] want is some kid from Norway to sue for $100 million for misappropriation of intellectual property." Surely Michels means Torvalds here, but if he'd care to supply us with the names of some sample litigious kids from Norway we'll be happy to pubish a correction. The rise of Linux presents a pretty clear threat to SCO's core x86 business, so Michels' willingness to lash-out is understandable. Dell shipping Red Hat on multiprocessor systems is ominous news for him, as is Intel's apparent support for early IA-64 Linux implementations . SCO is hoping to make great strides by getting its own Unix on IA-64 early, so go figure. Taking a pop at Intel and Dell favourite Red Hat, Michels describes it as Linux technology with a lot less value added [than SCO does, we presume he means], and packaged as "better than SCO." Whixh he says it isn't. He says Linux didn't break ground, but is just a re-engineered lightweight kernel that implements Unix APIs. Linux is "just a kernel" that "some punk young kids" have engineered pieces around. It also has weaknesses in that there's no control of the roadmap, it doesn't have millions spent on reliability testing, which he says "isn't stuff that people do for fun at home with volunteers," and it doesn't scale, or handle multiprocessors well. Over to Dell, Intel, and the mullahs on that one then. Goodbye, Doug... ®

A new approach to endpoint data protection

More from The Register

next story
Philip K Dick 'Nazi alternate reality' story to be made into TV series
Amazon Studios, Ridley Scott firm to produce The Man in the High Castle
Nintend-OH NO! Sorry, Mario – your profits are in another castle
Red-hatted mascot, red-colored logo, red-stained finance books
Sonos AXES support for Apple's iOS4 and 5
Want to use your iThing? You can't - it's too old
Joe Average isn't worth $10 a year to Mark Zuckerberg
The Social Network deflates the PC resurgence with mobile-only usage prediction
Feel free to BONK on the TUBE, says Transport for London
Plus: Almost NOBODY uses pay-by-bonk on buses - Visa
Twitch rich as Google flicks $1bn hitch switch, claims snitch
Gameplay streaming biz and search king refuse to deny fresh gobble rumors
Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE
4,000 pixels is niche now... Don't say we didn't warn you
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?