Feeds

What the Hell is…Camino and Rambus all about?

Number one in an occasional series for those who can’t be bothered to RTFM

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Those awfully clever folks at Intel have managed to bump up processor power by around 200 times since the introduction of the 486 ten years ago. Trouble is, memory technology has only improved by a measly 20 times in the same period. Fancy caches can help a bit, but something fundamental needs to change in order to get the most system bang for your CPU buck. DRAM vendors have increased memory densities by almost 1,000 fold – that’s faster than even Microsoft’s bloatware demands – and this means that fewer memory devices are needed to reach the RAM requirements of a system, allowing new ways of enabling the CPU and memory to talk to each other to be investigated. Rambus aims to deliver more than ten times the performance of today’s memory subsystems while keeping costs down and providing a means of reusing SDRAM DIMMs. Intel’s delayed Camino (820) chipset will feature a gizmo called a Memory Translator Hub (MTH) enabling either (but not both) SDRAM DIMMs or direct RDRAM SRIMMs to be used. An 820-based system will support up to 1.5Gb of SRIMM memory or 1Gb if DIMMs are used. Camino is based on a hub architecture with a Memory Controller Hub (MCH) at its heart. The MCH in turn talks to the CPU through the host bus (at 133MHz), the graphics subsystem through the AGP bus (AGP 4X) and the memory through Rambus. Everything else is handled by the I/O Controller Hub (ICH) which has a direct link to the MCH. Clear? It gets more complex. 300MHz Rambus direct RDRAM is only supported at 100MHz FSB speeds, while 400MHz parts are happy at 133MHz too. Could this be the reason Camino is late? Who can tell? So what about the performance benefits then? Rambus will enable the CPU and memory subsystem to communicate at up to 800MHz and 1.6 Gb/second while using around a fifth of the power – that’s around three times the bandwidth of today’s conventional 100MHz SDRAM. And in the future, the ability of the MCH to talk to up to four memory channels simultaneously will bring bandwidths up to 6.4Gb/second in high-end systems. Unlike today’s memory, you’ll need to fit continuity modules in empty memory slots because Rambus daisy chains its memory a bit like SCSI devices. While this may at first sound a tad clunky, it apparently means that clocking the memory is simpler and is claimed to be electrically superior, offering active power management of individual memory modules. Find out more at Rambus ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Special pleading against mass surveillance won't help anyone
Protecting journalists alone won't protect their sources
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.