Feeds

SGI “disappointed” with Q3

Loss narrows, but revenue falls too

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top three mobile application threats

SGI -- the computer company formerly known as Silicon Graphics -- was yesterday forced to admit its recovery programme was not going as smoothly as planned when it posted "disappointing" Q3 results, dispite a marked reduction in the amount of money it lost. The company posted a loss of $40 million for the quarter, ended . That's nearly a quarter of the $153 million it lost in the same period last year. However, revenue for the third quarter was $619 million, compared with $708 million in the same quarter a year ago. "These shortfalls mask the progress that we are continuing to make in other areas of our business, including strong new products, improved quality and operational efficiency, and lower expenses. We are focusing our efforts on generating demand in growing markets," said SGI's chairman and CEO, Richard Belluzzo. And, responding to analysts' predictions that SGI would make a profit in the current quarter, senior VP for corporate operations Bill Kelly told US newswires: "That's not going to happen." "Third quarter is not what we wanted it to be," he added. Still, the company continues to own 85 per cent of Risc processor manufacturer MIPS, and plans to divest itself of a good proportion of that stake. It had already planned to take its shareholding down to 65 per cent, but the latest figures may persude Belluzzo to sell more. It's a strategy working quite well over at Apple -- its recent profitable quarters have been boosted by ditching chunks of its stake in AMD Holdings. Apple and SGI, as companies long associated with creative computing, have much in common. Both ran into real trouble by failing to keep up with wider industry developments and, in many ways, relying on their userbase to stick with them and not opt to migrate to cheaper platforms. Both are now targetting more entry-level customers with designer hardware, and both are looking to the open source world to improve their software support. In SGI's case, that means adopting Linux, initially alongside its Windows NT-based offerings, launched earlier this year, and perhaps replacing NT as the company's core operating system. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich
New 'Atlas of ICT Activity' finds innovation isn't happening at Silicon Roundabout
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.