Feeds

Intel UK compares PIII serial number to car licence plate

First car fatalities in UK make Chipzilla look highly insensitive

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

100 years ago The oldest UK newspaper, The Observer, published only on Sundays, today quoted an unnamed Intel UK spokesperson as saying: "You have to put licence plates on your car if you want to drive, this development is the electronic extension of that." He or she was driven to say so because a reporter from The Observer was asking about the significance of the "unique" serial number contained in Pentium IIIs (Katmais). But given the occasion, Intel's remarks are likely to offend many people. PCs, after all, do not drive down the roads of Britain, although both Microsoft and Intel would like to see their systems careering like a veritable Jehu. Cars, many people believe, are responsible for tens of thousands of deaths, plus bad and smelly effects on the atmosphere. One hundred years ago (in fact, on February 25th, 1899), a one Major James Richer was being driven down Grove Hill, on Harrow-on-the-Hill, by Edwin Sewell at 25mph. The Daimler was designed to drive only at 14mph, but Sewell, who was a salesman for Daimler, was overclocking the motor to the limit in the hope of good sales. Major Richer was a representative for the well-known Army & Navy Stores. Both men died when the wooden wheels on the wagon collapsed. The Daimler representative and the Major had just had cups of tea at the Kings Head, at the top of the hill. The pub still stands today, and there is a plaque to mark the first car fatality in the UK. On the anniversary, in Harrow, Friends of the Earth held a mock funeral procession to commemorate the first road deaths in Britain. Now Microsoft is being accused of using a similar software system to Intel. See our story: MS ID number systems could track all Windows users. At The Register, we're not sure we want to see cars powered by Wintel...® RegIstroid II Kings ix, 20 "...the driving is like the son of Nimshi; for he driveth furiously."

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
In the next four weeks, 100 people will decide the future of the web
While America tucks into Thanksgiving turkey, the world will be taking over the net
Microsoft EU warns: If you have ties to the US, Feds can get your data
European corps can't afford to get complacent while American Big Biz battles Uncle Sam
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.