Feeds

MP3 developer to head SDMI

Music industry body appoints executive director with a "repuation for neutrality"

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

The Secure Digital Music Initiative (SDMI), the music industry-led attempt to define a standard for digital music delivery, kicked off its first major meeting, held in Los Angeles last Friday. While the meeting was little more than a chance to discuss the SDMI's aims and organisational structure, it did begin with a hand been tentatively extended to the MP3 community. First, the organisation announced it had appointed Dr Leonardo Chiariglione as executive director. Chiariglione isn't well known in Net circles, but as one of leaders of the MPEG development process, he brings a close understanding of MP3 (or MPEG 1 Audio Layer 3, as it's more formally known). His proximity to the standards process should help to calm the fears of those in the MP3 community who believe the SDMI will ultimately become the play-thing of the music industry, to be used to dominate Internet-based music business. Chiariglione is still involved in the evolution of the MPEG standard, which is beginning to incorporate the kind of rights-protection technology that bodies like the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) have always slammed MP3 for lacking. Specifically, MPEG 4 will add content delivery tracking technology. Later during the meeting, the RIAA's executive VP and general counsel Cary Sherman, discussed the SDMI's role in detail, which now seems to be considering a more ecumenical approach than its early publicity as an MP3-smasher suggested. "We intend to achieve an infrastructure that will support every kind of consumer transaction involving music in the future," he said, adding that that infrastructure would "enable all music to be read and reacted to in a common way." And a spokeswoman added: "The SDMI is not attempting to select from a field of competing technologies, but to look for a way to marry multiple approaches." Essentially, the SDMI is seeking to develop a rights management specification that can work alongside existing technologies and format. MP3 can clearly play a part in that as much as formats like a2b and Liquid Audio that build in rights management data -- it's simply a matter of tying it specific levels of access and duplication freedom, as set by artists and publishers. Still, SDMI does have interests beyond the MP3 debate. It was also revealed that it is looking at ways of controlling access to music stored on existing formats, including CDs. However, the success of that programme will depend on hardware manufacturers adding the appropriate firmware to their drive, and the SDMI recognises this will take some negotiation to be made to work. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Premier League wants to PURGE ALL FOOTIE GIFs from social media
Not paying Murdoch? You're gonna get a right LEGALLING - thanks to automated software
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Ballmer quits Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Online tat bazaar eBay coughs to YET ANOTHER outage
Web-based flea market struck dumb by size and scale of fail
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
Amazon takes swipe at PayPal, Square with card reader for mobes
Etailer plans to undercut rivals with low transaction fee offer
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.