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Yu demonstrates 1GHz chip, talks roadmap talk

Is there liquid nitrogen behind the curtain?

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5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Intel Developer Forum Albert Yu, a senior VP at Intel US, demonstrated a microprocessor running at 1GHz. We said he would in our story 1GHz Intel story takes on Alice-like dimensions. But attendees at the Intel Developer Forum were not permitted to peep behind the scenes to see whether or not it was using Kryotech temperature-reduction technology. Yu also sketched out details of the Intel roadmap over the next year or two. He said that there will be a performance desktop running at 550MHz in Q2 of this year. In the second half of the year, Intel will take 0.18 micron technology to over 600MHz. In the same time frame, Intel will introduce technology delivering a frontside bus speed of 133MHz. On the mobile front, Intel will deliver a 0.18 micron part running at 433MHz with die on cache in the middle of the year. "This is hot technology but it's really cool," said Yu, as he demonstrated a system running. Later on in the year, Intel will deliver PII/mobile frequencies greater than 500MHz. Geyserville technology will not arrive until next year, said Yu. Intel's mobile Celeron platform, first revealed here in The Register will come at speeds of 300MHz, 333MHz and 366MHz, with a 400MHz system later on in the year. On the server front, Intel will deliver its PIII Xeon chips next month, starting at speeds of 450MHz and 500MHz, with 550MHz parts shipping soon after. He said: "All indications are that performance will be significantly higher than the PII," he said, without specifying by exactly how much. Yu also demoed a 12 foot, eight megapixel screen, powered by 12 Pentium III Xeons. While Yu mentioned future Foster technology, rather significantly he neglected to mention Willamette. Intel is keeping remarkably silent about this. He said that Intel was on track to deliver Merced samples by the middle of the year. He said: "We're in the final stages of circuit design and layout. We have seven operating systems running on Merced including Win64 and several versions of Unix." Intel is also working with the OSS to port Linux to the Merced architecture, said Yu. McKinley will have twice the performance of Merced with samples late in the year 2000, and production in 2001. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

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