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AMD K6-III is a go-go

And now the real battle of IntelDum and AMDee starts

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Intel Developer Forum As expected, AMD will formally announce its K6-III processor today, a full three days ahead of Intel's official announcement of its Pentium III parts. If you are in the slightest bit interested in why The Register compares AMD to Tweedledee and Intel to Tweedledum, go here. The K6-III will initially be released at 400MHz, shipping immediately. AMD is promising that it will introduce the K6-III 450MHz in volume in March. The prices of the chips are expected to undercut Intel's Pentium III parts by a considerable amount, with pricing for the 400MHz just under $290 and the 450MHz part just over $470. But Intel is not likely to take this slash and burn effort by AMD lying down. Chip companies are notoriously aggressive and Intel will cut the price of its high-end Pentium IIs this week. It may also be forced to moderate prices on its Pentium IIIs. That will leave a bitter taste in Intel sales folks' mouths, if the decision is taken. It would have to be at the highest level of the corporation because shareholders would not be happy. As revealed here exclusively, the AMD K6-3, formerly codenamed Sharptooth, will now be re-named the K6-III, in an attempt to pitch the microprocessor family directly against Intel's Pentium III The real questions now hinge around whether or not the performance of the AMD parts compares favourably with the Pentium III parts. Intel has not yet released details of its benchmarks for the Pentium III, but is expected to do so on the day of its launch, Thursday. However, AMD cannot compete on the marketing and advertising side with Intel, which will spend $300 million promoting the Pentium III. The Great Satan of Haircuts (Compaq) is likely to announce support for the K6-III, as is Gateway, as revealed here. Dell is indifferent -- even though it is using Tandem non-stop stuff to support its supply chain. ®

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