Feeds

HMV to explore digital music distribution

Deal with IBM will ready retailer to exploit the results of the Madison Project

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

UK-based worldwide music retail chain HMV today announced it is to work with IBM on the development of Web sites to sell music over the Internet. But while the retailer was keen to stress the sites will initially be used as a cassette and CD sales mechanism, expanding the service to provide digital distribution can't be far behind. HMV said it will open a sales site in Canada in the second quarter of the year, followed by sites in the UK and Japan. However, the company's UK site already allows visitors to order from a selection of best-selling recordings. That suggests the sites will quickly expand the range of titles they cover to offer a complete selection of 'in print' discs -- the company claims around 250,000 recordings will be offered. By the time that's up and running, the results of the first public trials of the Madison Project should be in (see Big Blue, Big Five to unveil Net music system). And which company connects the HMV announcement to Madison? IBM. Big Blue will work with the retailer on its Web sites, and is currently readying its digital music distribution system for a Spring trial in San Diego. Two components make Madison particularly interesting: first, the backing of the world's top five record labels -- Sony, EMI (which, incidentally, owns a goodly portion of HMV; beginning to see how it all fits together, yet?), Time-Warner, Universal and Bertelsmann -- and, secondly, the very real prospect it offers for allowing retailers to use the Internet to turn their stores into custom CD plants -- why hold a limited stock when you can use the majors' Internet music archives to provide customers with almost every recording ever made? (see IBM's Project Madison: the music industry's Manhattan Project?). Clearly, HMV, which, as a High Street based retailer, stands to lose the most from Internet-based sales and, ultimately, direct digital delivery of music, sees things that way too. At today's announcement, the company wouldn't say when it will offer digital downloads, but Duncan Bell, HMV's director for business development and IT, did admit that "as the technology becomes available for music downloading, we will explore it". With Madison's trial so close, that exploration is set to begin very soon. ®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.