Feeds

UK police deny Web conspiracy

Civil liberties organisation accused of stirring up paranoia

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Civil rights activists in the UK have been accused of spreading alarmist reports after allegedly uncovering a plot by police to obtain confidential information held by ISPs about their customers. The Cyber-Rights & Cyber-Liberties (UK) organisation said it had discovered that the Internet Service Providers Association (ISPA) last year gave a secret briefing to the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) about what customer information ISPs could pass to the police. Yaman Akdeniz, director of Cyber-Rights & Cyber-Liberties (UK) claimed he'd received a leaked document which proved ISPA was in cahoots with the police and published the so-called evidence as part of a wider report on personal freedom of the Internet. Both Nicholas Lansman, secretary general of ISPA and the chairman of the ACPO Computer Crime Group, Detective Chief Superintendent Keith Akerman, have denied anything sinister took place. DCS Akerman confirmed that a meeting had taken place in November 1997 but said that it was a "private" meeting (as opposed to a public meeting) and not a "secret" meeting, as alleged by Cyber-Rights & Cyber-Liberties (UK). He and Lansman confirmed that the document obtained by the Cyber-Rights & Cyber-Liberties (UK) did indeed exist, but said it was an internal discussion document and not a statement of policy. The report called ISPA: Industry Capabilities for the Provision of Information was written by the former chief executive of ISPA, David Kennedy, and discusses in some length the type of information that could be supplied to police. But the report also contains a number of caveats saying that any request for information must be supported by "appropriate documentation". "For anyone to allege that the police are entering into a conspiracy to circumvent the normal legal process is simply ludicrous -- it's too silly even to contemplate," said DCS Akerman. Even if this was true and the police obtained information illegally about people which subsequently lead to a prosecution, it wouldn't be admissible in court, he said. Despite this Akdeniz is adamant that ISPA is hiding something. "With all these possibilities and capabilities for the provisions of information through the ISPs to the police, ISPA runs the risk of becoming the Big Brother Providers Association. The leaked report shows that our concerns were fully justified, and that secrecy, rather than media disinformation was at work with the activities of the ACPO/ISPs Forum," he said. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.