Feeds

Europe-wide Net boycott a qualified success

Nearly 90 per cent of Spanish users heed the call - but hardly any Brits did

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Organisers of the latest European Internet strike today claimed action taken olast weekend had been a success, with Net traffic in at least one country down almost 90 per cent.

Called by the UK's Campaign for Unmetered Calls (CUT), the 24-hour strike took place last Sunday in nine European countries: Britain, France, Portugal, Spain, Greece, Italy, Poland, Belgium and Switzerland. The first four of these countries have already experienced Internet boycott action individually.

In France, Internet dial-up calls were down 65 per cent, according to the French Association of Unhappy Internauts, the same group that organised a strike (see French Internet strike 'a success', claims organiser) last December. The Spanish organiser, meanwhile, claimed 87 per cent of Internet users followed the call to keep their modems switched off.

But in Britain, even the strike's overall organiser, claimed it had been ineffective. "Strikes are a dead loss here," complained a CUT spokesman. CUT is planning a series of awareness-raising programmes for the summer. An earlier British strike also failed to match the level of support garnered by similar action in other European countries. Sunday's strike, and those that preceded it, were called to protest at the high call charges many European users pay for dial-up Internet access.

It's notable that most have been called in countries that only ended state-controlled telecoms monopolies relatively recently. Britain's phone network was opened to players other than British Telecom (BT) in the early 80s, suggesting British users are, on the whole, happy with the level of call charges, particularly with the various discounts BT offers to frequent callers.

Elsewhere, a strike in Germany (see German Net strike goes ahead) saw one telco, Mobilcom, introduce a flat fee for Internet access, though the target of the action, Deutsche Telekom, was not persuaded to do so, though it did cut phone charges just days before the strike. ®

See also

British Telecom threatened with two cyberstrikes
France Telecom cuts interconnection charges
French users call second Net boycott
Portuguese Internet strike goes ahead

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned
Swedish court rules there's 'great risk' WikiLeaker will dodge prosecution
NSA mass spying reform KILLED by US Senators
Democrats needed just TWO more votes to keep alive bill reining in some surveillance
'Internet Freedom Panel' to keep web overlord ICANN out of Russian hands – new proposal
Come back with our internet! cries Republican drawing up bill
What a Mesa: Apple vows to re-use titsup GT sapphire glass plant
Commits to American manufacturing ... of secret tech
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?