Feeds

Maritz on… Linux

"Number of Linux developers vastly exceeds the number of NT developers"

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

The cross examination of Microsoft group VP Paul Maritz showed Microsoft showing some real concern about Linux. Maritz probably didn't intend to announce under the DoJ spotlight that the number of applications that can run on Caldera's Linux was "probably several thousand". He was most reticent to produce a figure for Windows lest it proved to be embarrassingly large. Maritz portrayed Linux as a significant competitor to Windows in his direct testimony, and claimed that "Linux is an operating system that consists of several million lines of code comparable in size, capability and complexity to Microsoft's Windows 98 and Windows NT operating systems". He did not properly distinguish the components of what he was calling Linux, nor introduce the term 'distribution'. Microsoft likes Linux in some ways, since it gives just a little street cred to the claim that Microsoft is potentially threatened. Maritz -- or the committee apparently writing his direct testimony -- thought that Linux was "'cool' (a significant factor among 'early adopters')". Robert Young, Red Hat's CEO, had stated an objective of decimating the value of the operating systems market, Maritz complained. Young didn't think Red Hat would realistically be a viable competitor to Microsoft for 20 years, but Maritz would not agree. Maritz did shoot down Microsoft's previous witness, economist Richard Schmalensee, for suggesting that Linux was mostly used to run servers. An interesting observation by Steve Lambright of Informix was that the Linux market is poised like the Web was two to three years ago. But the remark in the testimony that is likely to reverberate is that "today the number of developers working on improving Linux vastly exceeds the number of Microsoft developers working on Windows NT". Warden fed Maritz a Wall Street Journal article on Linux in which it was announced that HP and Silicon Graphics would be offering Linux with Intel processors on servers, with HP noting that it may offer Linux on the desktop if it were Windows friendly and simplified. Maritz thought that "Linux is a product that Microsoft and other system publishers ignore at their peril". We shall see. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?