Rest of European press get trashed by Intel

Holland, Hungary, Scandinavia, SA, Poland et al -- this is the Full Monty

Hungarian, Dutch and Italian journalists have also come in for special treatment according to Intel press guidelines. And Polish, Scandinavian and South African journalists are also treated in a document The Register has seen. According to the document, which unfortunately we were only shown at a Computer Trade Show in Birmingham last week, so had to take detailed notes, "political issues" must be avoided when dealing with Hungarian hacks. Price and reliability, however, will capture their hearts. Dutch journalists are generally a good lot, thinks Intel. They are down to earth but like the Brits dislike the "Goliath's" (sic) of this world. And, claims the document, journalists from The Netherlands operate counter moves against anything that is successful. Those journalists who meet Intel from Italy are privileged. The document says they are warm people and much more intimate than those from cooler climes. "Italians are often late to interviews and press conferences," says Intel. But employees of the chip giant should not think this is a mark of disrespect. And Italian journalists are luckier than those from the UK, the USA, or Russia. Intel employees should always pay the bill. Scandinavian journalists are a bit like those from the UK but the Danish are more emotional than the Norwegians or the Swedes. Intel employees should never compare one Scandinavian country with another. The document is unclear whether Finns are included in the general description. Polish journalists and those from the Czech Republic receive independent treatment from Intel's press briefing document. In Poland, Intel employees should keep a physical distance from the journalists. There are hardly any taboos in the country, thinks Intel. You have to wear a smart suit and tie when talking to Polish hacks. In the Czech Republic, trying to bluff is not advised, hacks are well educated and unlike Russian journalists, not underpaid intellectuals. Politeness is a sine qua non. Finally, and this is the last in The Register's series from the booklet, Working with the European Press, in South Africa you have to behave in a normal US or British way. However, if Intel employees get aggressive, the locals think this is old fashioned. And politics and race/creed have to be avoided at all costs. Now if only Intel had thought that before it released the booklet to its PR people across the world. ® Related Stories Euro journalists get Intel treatment Grove's Intel attacks UK journalism Spanish journalists get Intel dictat

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