Feeds

MS Terminal Server policy collapses

Beset by raging corporate customers, Redmond is running up the white flag

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Any minute now Microsoft will abandon its Windows Terminal server strategy, halving prices and reintroducing concurrent licensing, according to reliable sources. The announcement is due this afternoon US Pacific time, and will slash the cost from $319 to $109 for a Terminal Server client plus a further $40 for an NT file and print Client Access Licence (CAL). Microsoft had previously insisted that each and every client connected to a Windows Terminal Server network had to pay an NT Workstation licence, whatever the operating system, plus a CAL, making Microsoft's take for each client equivalent to having a full-blown NT workstation installed. Corporate customers wanting to implement thin client system squealed long and loud, but Microsoft was adamant (although we should note that The Register was predicting the entire show would crash around Redmond's ears some months back). The rout is however now complete. Aside from the basic halving of the cost of Terminal Server clients, Microsoft is to offer an additional discount of up to 50 per cent to enterprise customers. Varying prices in this way for the big customers is more or less what goes on normally at Microsoft, so the new price level can probably be defined as whatever it takes not to lose the business. On top of this Microsoft will be offering enterprise customers half price CALs for people who need to connect from home as well (previously it was the full whack for both licences), and will be reintroducing what seems to be a concurrent licensing system. The Internet Connection Licence is a cool $10,000 for 200 of something called "anonymous users." That is, it's a mechanism to budget for Internet operations which are acting as Application Service Providers, allowing time-shared access to Win32 applications running on a Web server. Ts & Cs of the Internet Connection Licence weren't absolutely clear at time of writing, but as it works out at $50 a pop it's probably an indication of the direction Terminal Server client licences are heading in. South, that is... ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned
Swedish court rules there's 'great risk' WikiLeaker will dodge prosecution
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
NSA mass spying reform KILLED by US Senators
Democrats needed just TWO more votes to keep alive bill reining in some surveillance
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
The total economic impact of Druva inSync
Examining the ROI enterprises may realize by implementing inSync, as they look to improve backup and recovery of endpoint data in a cost-effective manner.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.