Updated: SMP Celerons hacked together

Intel fails to stop the hardware boys. Next stop, AMD?

Hardware enthusiasts worldwide are combining Celeron processors to create symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) systems, despite Intel's attempt to block the possibility. The trend was started by Japanese enthusiast Kikumara, but now others are putting together systems based on the technology. Kikumara has provided step-by-step instructions on his Web site and there is another series of instructions now available at Fastgraphics. The process is not trivial unless you're a wiz with a soldering iron and a screwdriver, but The Register believes it won't be long before some entrepreneur starts to sell systems based on the fix. Because the Celeron is basically a cut-down Pentium II, there are few differences between the processors. This fact is known to Intel and to hardware enthusiasts, the chip giant wants to differentiate the Celeron from the Pentium II -- because of its pricing strategy. However, Kikumara closely studied the documentation and managed to make working systems. Intel is likely to take a dim view of the technology, which is almost certain to breach its warranties. But whether it can prevent entrepreneurs selling such systems is a different matter. Isn't it? An Intel representative commented: "The simple question is why someone would do this. I can't see you can make any margin unless the parts are overclocked. Would you buy a system with holes drilled in the motherboard? These guys have too much time on their hands -- they should be writing novels rather than drilling holes in microprocessors." ®

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