Feeds

Intel makes more money than playing Monopoly

Who can save us now from the Great Satan of Chips?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Top three mobile application threats

Intel caught analysts cold with a superb set of Q4 results, smashing in-house records for revenue, earnings per share, net income, and shipments in all territories -- including the blighted Asia Pacific. Giving the FTC and conspiracy theorists something substantial to chew their teeth on, Intel declared total 1998 sales of $26.3 billion, up 5 per cent on 1997, and net income of $6.1 billion, down 13 per cent on the previous year. All the bad news for Intel took place in the first half of the year. The company hailed a storming Q4 and noted seasonally strong demand for P6 parts in the second half. Q4 revenue of $7.6 billion was up 17 percent from fourth quarter 1997 revenue of $6.5 billion. Fourth quarter revenue was up 13 percent from third quarter 1998 revenue of $6.7 billion. Record fourth quarter net income of $2.1 billion was up 18 percent from fourth quarter 1997 net income of $1.7 billion. Net income in the fourth quarter was up 32 percent from third quarter 1998 net income of $1.6 billion. The Register thought Intel’s X.86 clone rivals were supposed to putting up a serious challenge for the budget market. If so, it certainly isn’t reflected in Intel’s results. The way things are going, 1999 will better for Intel. It enters 1999 with a full roadmap for every market segment, and with its current batch of Celerons, it has low-end chips that OEMs actually want to buy. PC shipments are projected to rise more than 15 per cent this year, according to the Nomura Research Institute -- and we can reasonably assume that Intel will power the lion’s share of these machines. Intel anticipates a gross margin of 57 per cent for 1999, compared with 54 per cent for all of 1998 – suggesting it expects strong sales for high-end, high margin Pentium III and Pentium III Xeon sales during the year. The Great Satan of chips is also turning the screws on its rivals on the technology front. CEO Craig Barrett said the company will soon begin the transition to 0.18 micron manufacture. It is also pumping in $3 billion into R&D, up from $2.7 billion in 1998. The company is putting some brakes on capital spending in 1999, setting aside a budget of only $3 billion. In 1998, capital spending was $4 billion -- although this amount included $475 million of capital assets bought from Digital. The smaller budget for 1999 is "primarily a result of reduced investment for new facilities and improved utilization of manufacturing equipment". ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich
New 'Atlas of ICT Activity' finds innovation isn't happening at Silicon Roundabout
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.