Feeds

Apple apes Swatch as iMac ships in multiple colours

Consumers more interested in shades than CPU cycles, claims Jobs

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

As iMac sales passed the 800,000 mark, Apple announced the latest revision of the consumer computer, increasing its spec, lowering its price and introducing a range of new colours. The new version, which began shipping in the US today, sports a 266MHz PowerPC 750 (aka G3) processor, up from 233MHz, and a 6GB hard drive (up from 4GB). The price falls from $1299 to $1199 -- earlier iMacs fall to $1049. The iMac will continue to be available with its distinctive translucent blue casing, but buyers will now be also able to choose from purple, green, orange and red -- though Apple names them after fruit to allow them to be trademarked and thus forcing peripherals manufacturers to pay the Mac maker to use them. Apple interim CEO Steve Jobs suggested keen iMacs fans might like to consider collecting the entire set. Actually, not long after taking up his current position, Jobs did say he would like Apple to become in some ways the IT equivalent of trendy watch manufacturer Swatch, so it seems he's had his way at last. Jobs also claimed this approach to computer design would "take consumer computing to a whole new level". However, The Register would like to remind readers that ICL offered a line of coloured Wintel boxes back in the late 80s. To be fair, these were bog-standard PCs sprayed red, blue or green, and so not quite a swish as the iMac, but the principle's the same. Speaking at the MacWorld Expo keynote in San Francisco, Jobs unveiled the latest iMac buyer statistics, taken last month, which showed that the structure of the market for the computer has changed little since its introduction. While the percentage of first-time computer buyers and Wintel users migrating to the Mac did increase, from 29 to 32 per cent and from 12 per cent to 13 per cent, respectively, that still leaves the combined total of existing Mac customers at 55 per cent. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.