A year ago: Intel takes buffalo stance on PC 100

SDRAM Soup of the Day clarified by Great Stan

The largest manufacturer of Pentium II processors in the world has said its conscience is clear about difficulties for DRAM suppliers and the PC 100 specification. Memory companies, distributors and assemblers have complained over the last few months that not all synchronous memory modules are the same, causing difficulties when configuring machines because the DRAM don't seem to work. But now Intel has written to The Register explaining its position on PC 100. The company said: "PC main memory bandwidth requirements keep increasing, driven by new PC platform applications and richer data types like 3D graphics and video and platform ingredients like faster processors, the Accelerated Graphics Port and faster serial buses." According to Lentil, Intel has written PC SDRAM specifications for 66 and 100 MHz SDRAM to "facilitate the development of SDRAM components and memory modules before the platforms are introduced". The letter continued: "The goal is to facilitate the development of memory components and modules that are compatible with the new memory controller requirements so they are readily available for early product samples and full volume production. "While many 66 MHz memory modules are compliant with the 66 MHz SDRAM spec, some modules aren't because the spec was introduced after these modules were developed. However, the majority of 100 MHz memory modules are compliant with the 'PC 100' spec because it was introduced prior to their development." ®

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