Feeds

A year ago: Disties hit again by VAT fraud scandal

UK authorities show limp approach to DRAM difficulties

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

If you talk to Alan Stanley, MD of the UK wing of French company Dane-Elec, he'll tell you, like many another poor soul in the memory distribution business, that times are tough and getting tougher. But while Stanley and his company compete in an ever more cutthroat business, the British authorities are not making it any easier, he feels. Members of the European Union operate different levels of value added tax (VAT), meaning that if you're a crook, you can shuffle SIMMs around the place and make extra margin points, all the time undercutting the legit distributors of the products. But while the problems been known about for quite some time, the UK authorities, Her Majesty's Custom & Excise, don't seem at all exercised about the problem in the slightest. Last year, the French VAT police, on the other hand, took a remorseless approach to the problem there, nicked a number of companies implicated in the fraud and even shut several of them down. The Register phoned the press office at Customs a couple of weeks before Christmas and asked the department what it was doing about the UK dimension to the problem. "We'll get back to you," came the reply. Another call, a week later, produced the interesting information that it wasn't a Customs problem and the press office had shunted the enquiry off to the National Investigation Service. Well, we weren't even aware that UK Customs had spun a part of itself off but in any event we didn't hear from them either. So while the investigators seem more concerned that cheap beer is flowing into the South of England (the tax on booze and ciggies is far less in France) and destroying our public houses, it seems that legit businesses stand the risk of going under while the huge VAT fraud goes unrecognised. Stanley pointed out to The Register that this type of fraud does not just apply to memories - there's all sorts of other goods on which tax is being evaded. While his customers - the dealers and resellers of this world - can hardly be blamed if they're offered even cheaper DRAM in their bid to make an extra few points, the UK authorities seem to be standing at the sidelines, wringing their hands and losing out on what they should be concentrating on - gathering revenues. ®

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Special pleading against mass surveillance won't help anyone
Protecting journalists alone won't protect their sources
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.