Sony recalls 60K US mobile phones

It seems the juice is a little higher than FCC guidelines, but don't worry...

Sony is recalling an estimated 60,000 dual-band CDMA handsets in the US, following the discovery that some of its phones could exceed Federal Communications Commission guidelines on radio frequency exposure. The company's Sony Electronics subsidiary yesterday said a "small number" of phones built between February and June may have excessive power settings, and that it would be contacting users to have them returned to upgrade centres for adjustment. Sony points out that the FCC guidelines are intended to allow a wide safety margin, but nevertheless the goof could turn into a spectacular own-goal for both Sony and CDMA. The issue of whether or not mobile phone exposure can be dangerous has been bubbling under for some time. Here in Europe the phone companies deny it, and despite some pretty wild allegations there doesn't seem to be any proof -- yet. But Sony accidentally selling 60,000 phones, at least some of which seem to breach the FCC limits, into the most litigious market in the world, won't be helpful for the phone manufacturers' case. And the likely increased concern about hazards isn't likely to be much of a boost for the nascent satellite phone services either. According to Sony, the affected phones are dual band, with model numbers CM-B3200, CM-B3200PRC, CM-B2200PRC and CM-B1201SPR. These have only been sold in the US. ®

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