Feeds

Iomega to update Zip to 250MB

Anti-Sony, Samsung spoiler tactic could also sidestep 'click of death' suit

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

Iomega will this week announce the successor to its popular 100MB Zip drive in a move designed to spoil Sony's soon-to-ship 200MB HiFD drive and Samsung's announcement of its forthcoming 123MB Pro-FD drive. The new Zip drive and media will offer a capacity of 250MB. However, it's not yet clear whether it will provide an equivalent performance boost over the Sony and Samsung drives, both of which are significantly faster than the original 100MB Zip. Equally, Iomega has yet to say whether the new Zip will offer backward compatibility with floppy drives, a feature all three of its rivals -- the Sony and Samsung drives, and Imation's SuperDisk drive -- offer and which the 100MB Zip failed to provide. Floppy disk support is key to where Iomega hopes to position the new drive. According to storage market researcher Disk/Trends, quoted on ZDNN, Iomega has had the 250MB ready for some time but was waiting for the Sony drive to ship before announcing its own product.That implies it is focusing more on the OEM floppy drive replacement market than the personal storage business that brought success to the original Zip. OEMs have been reluctant to commit to Zip fully because they still needed to fit a floppy drive. Its rivals, however, can argue that with their units, PC vendors need not fit a floppy drive. However, prices have so far been too high for them to view these high capacity drives as anything other than optional to Iomega's benefit. And with renewed interest in the 'click of death' fault allegedly endemic in 100MB Zip drives -- allegations recently brought back to life through a lawsuit filed against the company (see Iomega sued over Zip-zapping 'click of death'), the new Zip also provides Iomega with a neat way of sidestepping the problem. ® See also Samsung readies fast floppy replacement

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.