Feeds

Samsung readies fast floppy replacement

But slower Zip, SuperDisk drives have plenty of time before its launched

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

Samsung has announced a challenger to Iomega's 100MB Zip and Imation's SuperDisk in the high-capacity floppy disk replacement market. The Pro-FD uses 123MB diskettes, but retains compatibility with old 720K and 1.44MB floppies. So too does the 120MB SuperDisk drive, but like the Zip, Imation's system is slow. Samsung claims it drive offers data transfer rates of 5MBps and is twice as fast as tradional floppy drives when it comes to using older media. It also sports a 128K data buffer. That puts the Pro-FD ahead in speed terms of Sony's forthcoming HiFD product which offers 200MB of storage, but transfer data at just 3.6MBps and is only compatible with 1.44MB floppies, as is the SuperDrive. There is also a question mark over Sony's commitment to its format. It originally promised to release the first HiFD drive in the Spring of this year, but the date was later revised to Summer 1998, and has now been put back to this Autumn. That said, Pro-FD drives won't be available until Q3 1999, so perhaps Sony still has time to throw in a couple more delays before in needs to launch. Samsung reckons its in with a chance of success in a market that has largely failed to do what it set out to do and completely replace the 1.44MB floppy. Zip's lack of backward compatibility ensured it was only ever going to be seen as an alternative, not a replacement. Imation has that role fully in mind for SuperDisk, but as J S Lee, MD of Samsung's Electromechanics division put it, "growth in the floppy replacement market has been hampered by the high cost of... components". That's why while some vendors have backed SuperDisk, most notably Gateway, NEC and Compaq, its largely been as an option rather than a standard part of the spec in place of the floppy drive. Lee claimed Samsung has made significant cost improvements on parts and media, ensuring Pro-FD will be more attractive to OEMs than its rivals. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Fast And Furious 6 cammer thrown in slammer for nearly three years
Man jailed for dodgy cinema recording of Hollywood movie
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Ballmer leaves Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?