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Intel Financial Services is offering a range of new leasing options through its 1500 Intel Product Integrators (IPIs), targeting small and medium businesses with deals starting at £450. There is no maximum spend limit and applications for finance up to £20,000 can be approved within ten minutes, according to John Longergan, Intel EMEA’s marketing manager. He said that many small and medium resellers don’t have easy access to competitive financing and the new programme simplifies the process by providing a one-stop shop. "IPIs will benefit from ease of access. Instead of negotiating separate lease finance, they can come to us for the finance, products, training and support. With online quotes, they’ll benefit from very fast turnaround." Mark Davison, marketing manager with Datrontech, believes that the lease options will prove popular with IPIs. "When a customer signs a lease, the finance company pays the integrator very quickly and the customer gets cheaper kit. It mean a fast turnaround of systems and cash," said Davison. Intel is offering both finance and residual value leases, and for a cost, users can upgrade systems during the lease term and write off residuals against new leases or purchases. Any kit returned reverts to Intel Financial Services, and Longergan said that some systems and components will be recycled while others will be channelled through Intel’s environmental disposal programmes, donated to charity and educational establishments. Intel has teamed up with Dana Commercial Credit (DCC), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Dana Corp, to provide the financing. Jon Singleton, DCC’s UK sales director said that leasing enables businesses to fit computing into tight budgets. “It helps protect against obsolescence, it provides the ability to upgrade equipment [and] maintaining a predictable payment schedule is a major benefit.” The Financial Services programme will cover a range of hardware, software and services, including non-Intel kit, but all desktops, workstations and mobiles must be based on Intel processors. ® Click for more stories Click for story index

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