Feeds

Intel price cuts boost PII over Celeron

'Strong acceptance' of PII means lower prices, higher volumes - so whither Celeron?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

As predicted here last week (Intel, AMD and Cyrix to feature in price cut blizzard) the Intel price cuts implemented today push higher performance Pentium II chips further into the mass market, and indicate a certain de-emphasis on Celeron. Several lower speed chips are no more, and although there is still some price advantage for Celeron, the gap between the 'Basic PC' line and PII has narrowed. Intel, which has seen PII-based machines obstinately succeed in price-sensitive markets while Celeron's performance has been somewhat less glorious, takes it on the chin by explaining: "Continued strong acceptance of Pentium II processors enables Intel to strongly ramp these products into higher volume price points." Loosely translated, this means the manufacturers and the market have decided they want PII rather than Celeron, so Intel has decided to give in a little. The biggest cut implemented is 30 per cent on the 350MHz PII, to $213. The 333MHz, which is the new entry level, is down 23 per cent to $181, and the 400MHz and 450MHz down 22 and 16 per cent respectively, to $375 and $562. So Intel clearly still thinks it can keep clear blue water between the lower end PIIs and the fastest. The Celeron 333MHz 128k cache version loses 17 per cent to $159, while the 300AMHz only 7 per cent to $138. Celeron is therefore being positioned for markets of extreme price sensitivity where running Intel is still essential, i.e., pretty narrow ones. It's at least arguably that Intel is still trying to figure out its low-end strategy. The PII Xeons also had cuts, the 400MHz with 1Mb cache down 30 per cent to $1,980, and the 400MHz with 512k cache down 27 per cent to $824, which is the same price as the 450 MHz version of the same chip. There were no cuts on the PII and Pentium mobile modules, where Intel must feel pretty secure still. (R) Click for more stories

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Big Content outs piracy hotbeds: São Paulo, Beijing ... TORONTO?
MPAA calls Canadians a bunch of bootlegging movie thieves
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
Hungary's internet tax cannot be allowed to set a precedent, says EC
More protests planned against giga-tariff for Tuesday evening
US court SHUTS DOWN 'scammers posing as Microsoft, Facebook support staff'
Netizens allegedly duped into paying for bogus tech advice
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.