Feeds

HP lines up Linux for embedded role

Linux-running standalone 'Web appliance' boxes could signal PA-Risc's survival

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

Hewlett-Packard admitted yesterday that it is exploring ways of offering Linux. But unlike other hardware vendors who have rushed to back the popular OS as a possible alternative to Windows NT, HP's take on it is rather more interesting. According to Lee Wilson, the director of marketing for HP's brand of Unix, HP-UX, the company is evaluating Linux's potential for controlling embedded systems. Quoted on US newswire C/Net, Wilson said: "We do see a place for Linux in certain application ares." These include what Wilson calls "Web appliances" -- single-function boxes that can be plugged into a network, such as firewalls or mail servers. Wilson also said HP was busy porting Linux to its PA Risc processor. Put these two snippets together and you have the core of a neat little gameplan. HP intends to shift its Unix boxes over to Intel's 64-bit Merced processor once it becomes available around the turn of the century. This, of course, leaves the PA-Risc at rather a loose end, and that's not something you'd have thought HP would want to do, having invested as much in the technology as it has. This Web appliance concept provides a role for PA-Risc in the post-Merced world. Whether Linux will be the host OS, of course, remains to be seen, not least because of Microsoft's own plans to create an embeddable version of NT. However, it would offer clear price and performance advantages. Looking at Linux as an OS for the commercial computing arena, Wilson is sceptical about its chances. While the forthcoming version 2.2 of the OS' kernel will improve its support for multi-processor systems, he reckons it still won't threaten other versions of Unix designed for such systems, such as... er... HP-UX. Equally, its inability to handle load balancing and resource sharing, both key requirements of enterprise servers, and its lack of a formal support structure will keep enterprise software vendors like SAP, PeopleSoft and Baan away, he added. ® Click for more stories

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich
New 'Atlas of ICT Activity' finds innovation isn't happening at Silicon Roundabout
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.