Feeds

Survey: price, not security bars consumer e-commerce

Offer lower prices and the world will beat a path to your Web site

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

A new survey has confounded the assumption that security, or lack of it, is the biggest barrier to consumer acceptance of e-commerce. Defining the Internet Shopper: Attitudes, Objectives and Behaviour, a survey of some 55,000 online users conducted jointly by Jupiter Communications and NFO Interactive, found that many surfers who visited e-commerce sites (called 'non-shoppers') and those that didn't (dubbed 'browsers')were actually disuaded from making purchases because the prices weren't good enough. The study found that 35 per cent of the Net surfers had bought goods or services via the Web during the last year and were satisfied with the experience. According to the Jupiter/NFO data, over 77 per cent of browsers and 64 per cent of non-shoppers would buy goods and services online if they could make greater savings. Traditionally, concern over the safety of sending credit card details over the Net has been highlighted as the main reason why consumers are wary of e-commerce. Given we've known about the basic economic principle that buyers prefer to spend as little as possible for centuries, you'd have thought that it this would be obvious, but there you go. "Aggressive pricing on select items will get customers in the door, and is a crucial step to help win the next phase of the customer acquisition battle," said Evan Cohen, Jupiter's director of group research. But he warned: "Vendors shouldn't slash prices across the board, but strategic discounting will help [e-commerce] players to convert non-buyers into online purchasers." The survey also found that many consumers are using Web-sourced information to help them decided what to buy offline. According to the data, researching products and services was the third most popular online activity. At the same time, Internet usage remains the province of the middle classes and up. The survery found that 65 per cent of all domestic Net users live in households with incomes of $100,000 or more. ® Click for more stories

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
Microsoft EU warns: If you have ties to the US, Feds can get your data
European corps can't afford to get complacent while American Big Biz battles Uncle Sam
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.