Feeds

Gates under fire over upgrade pricing, licence policies

Apparently concurrent licensing was unpopular, so Microsoft dropped it. Unpopular with Microsoft's beanies, was that?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

In between defending Microsoft over the current DoJ action and telling the DoJ where it should point the next one, Gates seems to have been taking some flak over Microsoft's NT Terminal Server licensing policies, and its upgrade pricing. Speaking at the Gartner Symposium in Florida yesterday he fielded claims that Microsoft has been ratcheting upgrade fees for its apps by claiming that Microsoft's revenue from Office on a per copy basis falls every year. But this is the antitrust action that didn't bark - yet. Before the coalition of US States merged their antitrust action with the DoJ's, they'd intended to push allegations of predatory pricing strategies on Microsoft applications, but that didn't make it into the merged complaint. Claims that Microsoft deliberately undercuts rivals with volume pricing deals and 'peppercorn' corporate licences are however rife. As are bitches from corporate customers who reckon they're being forced to pay penal rates for upgrades so their organisations can stay current. And, sometimes, so their apps and operating systems are going to carry on working together. Note that Gates answered the question by referring to Office - but SQL Server and Exchange might be more interesting places for people to look. The eruption of complaints about Terminal Server licensing is also interesting. At the Citrix Thinergy conference in Florida last month large numbers of attendees were, basically, boiling mad about Terminal Server licensing (Microsoft licence policy crumbles under fire) . Microsoft imposes a 'per seat' licence fee, so any machine that will at some point be connected to NT Terminal Server needs an NT Workstation licence and a CAL (Client Access Licence). The users want concurrent licensing, which is a lot cheaper for them because they only pay for the number of machines connected to the server at any one time. Most of them argue that Microsoft's licensing policy for Terminal Server is a real negative in rolling out thin client/server network systems - Microsoft's share of the cake makes a big difference to costs, so potential customers aren't deploying anything like as fast as they'd want to otherwise. So here's Bill's take on it. He claims that concurrent licensing is yesterday's model - Microsoft abandoned it because it was difficult to administer (translation: We think our customers were lying to us) and "unpopular." If there's anybody out there who doesn't work for Microsoft and thinks concurrent licensing is unpopular with anybody but Microsoft, please mail us. Here, we reckon this is a dam that's about to burst. ® Click for more stories

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.