Feeds

Intel chief claims Microsoft alliance still strong

But StrongARM, appliances and Java tell a different story

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Bouncing onwards from his visit to London earlier this week Intel CEO Craig Barrett has been telling journalists that his company's relationship with Microsoft is still strong today, maybe even stronger than it's been in the past. But Barrett protests too much -- in the same breath, he's capable of telling Reuters' reporter that Intel is taking a neutral view of the impending competition between Symbian and Microsoft's Windows CE. You wouldn't credit that this is a man whose company just last week (see Intel network scheme means war with Microsoft) announced it would build a range of cheap, embedded network devices that won't be running Microsoft operating systems and that look like they won't be very happy connecting to NT servers either. Meanwhile, Barrett's claimed neutrality between CE and Symbian doesn't sit happily with Intel's recently discovered enthusiasm for StrongARM, likely to be the platform for at least some of the aforementioned 'thin server appliance', and a strong contender as the platform of choice for the next generation of phones form Symbian companies. The point here is that Intel focussing on ARM will inevitably tug it into the Symbian camp. To understand why you need to understand what Symbian is about. Looked at from the wrong direction it's an alliance of Ericsson, Motorola and Nokia that was stitched-up in order to provide them with a platform for their smart phones and communications devices. Granted, it is that as far as these companies are concerned, but the other part of the Symbian group, Psion, is the one that's contributing the OS technology, and its goals are rather different. In setting up Psion Software, the part of the group that turned into Symbian earlier this year, Psion was aiming to OEM a tightly-linked software and hardware platform consisting of ARM hardware and Psion's EPOC32 OS. Psion's software has been developed over a long period for low resource platforms, and it's appropriate for a whole range of devices in the mobile, pocket and embedded markets. Windows CE isn't. A CE port to ARM now exists, and Microsoft has all sorts of plans for extending CE into other markets, but at the moment the company's main focus seems to be on the Jupiter version of CE, a fatter version that may cannibalise sales of Windows on sub-notebooks. So if Intel's going to be fabbing StrongARM and designing new generations of the chip (which it is), it'll find its customers will tend to be using EPOC for a lot of their devices, and it will probably find itself at least considering the OS for some of its own devices. On the other hand, ARM's latest licensing deal with HP may give CE a boost if one of HP's plans is to switch its line of CE machines to ARM, but ARM's joining Intel in Bluetooth suggests that large numbers of StrongARM sales will go via a different route. And Intel's own Java development will surely turn the company's thoughts to JavaOS, or even StrongARM-based Java chips. But if Craig says he's still great chums with Bill, it must be true, right? ® Click for more stories

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.