Feeds

Roundup: yesterday's markets

Stock prices from around the world

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Security for virtualized datacentres

Fed chairman Alan Greenspan ignited the world's markets with his suggestion (subject to a vote of the Federal Open Market Committee on Tuesday) that the Fed will cut short-term interest rates next week. The Senate had been about to vote a resolution urging a rate cut, but dropped it on whispers of the Fed's move. It is extraordinary that such a move could have such an effect on markets. A small cut in the 5.5 percent inter-bank overnight rate is unlikely to have anything like the effect on companies that the announcement had on the market. It is a psychological message, in effect -- that inflation will be restrained by an economic slowdown. The result was a rise in the Dow of 257 points, to 8154, making 1998 gains positive once again. NASDAQ rose 62 to 1760. Internet stocks showed strong gains after their recent thrashing, although the whole technology sector did very well. Major gainers in percent: Adobe (5.0), Amazon.com (19), AMD (11.7), AOL (9.7), Apple (3.5), Broadcast.com (11.0), Cisco (5.4), CNET (19.6), Datastream (32), Dell (6.7), Excite (33), HP (5.9), IBM (3.4), Intel (4.2), Informix (3.8), Inktomi (11.1), Intuit (16.4), Lycos (19), Microsoft (4.1), National Semi (3.8), Netscape (8.3), Quantum (5.4), Qwest Seagate (4.5), Sun Yahoo (15), VLSI (7.1) Losers included Symantec (-3.6 percent), and Broadvision, a developer of e-commerce software, fell 25 percent because of concerns about how it recognised revenue from a renegotiated agreement to license software to Iona Technologies. The volume of Broadview shares traded was more then eight times the average over the last three months. The Center for Financial Research and Analysis, which produces a newsletter that looks for accounting irregularities, drew attention to its findings. Broadvision had been tipped by financial analysts, and the current problem is not apparently related to the current quarter's expectations, according to Janine Kromhout of Broadview in a conference call yesterday. eBays IPO, after earlier expectations of $14-16, was priced at $18, which was considered to be rather high, although it is the first IPO for almost a month. ®

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.