Feeds

Survey: ISP churn rate still high

Most users have been with their ISP less than two years

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

A World Research survey suggests that 16 per cent of Internet users will change ISPs in the next six months. The self-selected sample of 3,590 users mostly accessed the Internet from home, and were dominantly male (73 per cent). Particular dislikes with ISPs were a slow log-in and too many busy signals. The geographic distribution of respondents was not given, but it appears to be overwhelmingly American. Favourite ISPs in terms of satisfaction were Erol's Internet, Sympatico and EarthLink Network, with the least-liked being WebTV, AT&T World\Net and AOL. The churn factor appears to have characteristics in common with those changing cellular telephony providers. Some 73 per cent of users had been with their ISP for less than two years, and 42 per cent for less than a year. Another recent study by the Interactive Solutions Group of Market Facts suggests that Internet users mirror the behaviour and attitudes of non-Internet users. The study was based on 3,000 matched sample households, using respondents from Market Facts' consumer panel. If the sample is matched demographically with actual census data, the company says that apart from different attitudes and behaviours towards technology, there are few significant differences between responses to surveys by telephone and mail, and through the Internet. A disturbing aspect of such surveys is that they serve the marketing purposes of the companies carrying out the surveys. A similar problem arises when software companies, for example, commission a market research organisation and -- lo and behold -- the results just happen to be very close to those desired by the commissioner, and the market research firm gets to undertake more studies. Furthermore, the market research firm gets free publicity when its results are publicised buy its client. In view of recent doubts expressed about sacred measures like the P-value test of Professor Sir Ronald Fisher, what are we to believe? ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Twitter: La la la, we have not heard of any NUDE JLaw, Upton SELFIES
If there are any on our site it is not our fault as we are not a PUBLISHER
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?