Feeds

Intel network scheme means war with Microsoft

Intel's plans for thin server appliances don't leave any room for Gates & Co

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Is Intel now at war with Microsoft? A read of the small print of the company's "Thin Server Appliance Strategy," announced earlier this week, makes it abundantly clear that the two companies are on a collision course. The Intel announcement was reported here, but has attracted little attention, no doubt because it was 1: About networking; 2: Largely unintelligible, and 3: a bit weird. But Intel's stated views on what a thin server appliance should be make it obvious that it should not be a Wintel box. Intel envisages thin servers as being simple, single task appliances that will typically be used by small businesses to provide specific kinds and levels of networking functionality. In one sense they're not going to be 'servers' at all - what Intel now refers to as the first such appliance, the Internet Station, was launched in January, really falls into the router category. But as Intel is now using the 'S' word about this and future appliances, we can presume that the company is thinking in terms of adding processing horsepower to various items of networking connectivity, and thus extending Intel's processor business outward. The strategy might use x86, but it sounds a lot like one that will find something useful for Intel's StrongARM developments. On several counts, Intel's "key product criteria" for thin server appliances will go down like a lead intern in Redmond. They have to be low cost (which actually may signal a change in Intel's strategy), and they "should be priced affordably based on functionality and should not require additional per seat licence fees" (our itals). This is important for two reasons - first of all, the mere fact that per seat licence fees should come up makes it absolutely clear that Intel is envisaging something with enough functionality to be considered as a server, and second because it's diametrically opposed to Microsoft's licensing policies. Intel also says the devices should be single function, and not be "cluttered with additional capabilities that will complicate the device or add unnecessary costs." This certainly doesn't sound like an operating system that comes out of Redmond. But most ominously, "Since these devices are designed to perform a single function, the hardware and operating system platforms should be designed for that specific function." This clearly fits a lot more closely with the Sun/Oracle NC view of the world than with anything Microsoft builds, or wants to build. If Intel really goes ahead with these devices, then it's clearly war. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.