Feeds

Andersen Consulting thinks Europe is a ball game

Study suggests Euro execs dumb

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

"Most European executives fail to understand the linkage between electronic commerce and current business issues," claims a study just released by Andersen Consulting at the IDC European Forum. Rather naively, Andersen suggests that this would "jeopardise the continent's long-term competitiveness" -- as though Europe were some ball game team that had to play to win. There's no doubt who is waiting on the touch line to be offered the job of coach. The study results were based on interviews with some 300 senior executives. It does not seem to have occurred to Paris-based Rosemary O'Mahony and her team, who undertook the study, that because of what may be simply called cultural differences, US executives are likely to respond differently to interview questions than European executives. Andersen says that there is not a great difference between the views of US and European executives so far as the future impact of e-commerce is concerned. However, around twice as many Americans thought that e-commerce was currently significant in their businesses, or represented a serious threat to their organisations. Two drawbacks to the report are that the interviews were conducted over the period December 1997 to July 1998 (a long time in the Internet age), and the sample size prevents meaningful breakdowns to be made by European country which is unfortunate because other evidence suggests that buying behaviour varies significantly from country to country. There is an underlying belief that the first mover will somehow win the e-commerce prize -- and that competitive pricing and delivery cost and speed will not cause businesses and consumers to switch suppliers by visiting a European competitor site that became available later than a US site. The conclusion that there are two possible scenarios -- eEurope" or "dead end" -- seems far fetched. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.